The Chinese Exclusion Act was repealed 65 years ago today

The Chinese Exclusion Act was repealed 65 years ago today:
After the Chinese-Canadian veteran soldiers came back from serving overseas in Asia and Europe, fighting for Canada, they helped to launch the appeal of the Chinese Immigration Act, also known as the Chinese Exclusion Act.
Starting in 1885, a head tax of $50 was imposed on Chinese immigrating to Canada.  Only Chinese – no other nationality was taxed in this manner.  In 1900, it was increased to $100, and to $500 in 1903.  Then on July 1st, 1923, the Chinese Exlusion Act was passed in Canadian Parliament, effectively banning any immigration from any person of Chinese ancestry – even if they were born in the USA.
After WW2, Canadians understood the atrocity of racism, having witnessed the liberation of Jewish Internment camps and mass graves in Nazi Germany.  But it still took a concerted effort of Canadian born citizens of Chinese ancestry to challenge Parliament and demand equality.   I am proud to say the my grand-uncle Daniel Lee was one of these Canadian veterans, along with his friend Roy Mah.
The following was compiled and written by Victor Wong on the Not Too Asian Facebook site:
http://asian.ca/law/cia1923.htm
http://asian.ca/law/ia1947.htm
http://www.mhso.ca/chinesecanadianwomen/en/downloads/education/immigration_laws_handout.pdf

On May 14, 2012 (today), the federal Parties are expected to make
Statements in the House of Commons at 3pm after Question Period to recognize
this important anniversary.

CCNC pays tribute to the families and groups that lobbied over decades to repeal this racist legislation. The Chinese Exclusion Act separated families and some were never able to reunite. The community stagnated as few families were formed due to an unbalanced gender ratio, aging, and some Chinese leaving Canada.
Some Canadian-borns volunteered and fought overseas for a country that didn’t even recognize their basic rights. Here is the story of the late Sgt Louis King and Operation Oblivion (written by Gary Gee): http://ccnc.ca/entryContent/08d45b830c5eb287.pdf.

Sgt. King fought two wars: the military conflict abroad and the war against racism at home. He and his generation won them both

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