I have an ulcer on my cornea

Ugh… I have an ulcer on my cornea.  It is kind of crazy that I saw 3 different doctors today.  I spent much of the afternoon and evenings visiting my GP office at 2pm, LGH Emergency at 4:30pm, then at the VGH Eyecare Clinic at 8pm.  The above picture is from August 2009 when I had a corneal abrasion –  thought possibly due to sand/grit from hanging out at Kalmalka Beach in Vernon, during a wind storm.

My regular doctor was all booked up so I saw her office partner Dr. Yam.  After putting some dye on my eye, she thought I might have a “tear” on my cornea, so she sent me to emergency.  At Lion’s Gate Hospital, I saw Dr. Andolfatto, who confirmed there was something wrong on my eye, and made an 8pm appointment for me to go to the Eye Clinic at VGH, where I saw Dr. Silver who made the final diagnosis.  Nice to know we have a great healthcare system that can set me up with an ophthalmologist at 8pm on a Friday night.

Well.. if it was a stomach ulcer… I wouldn’t be able to drink any alcohol. But since I have an eye patch, and the ulcer is on my eye… I can have a shot of Captain Morgan for every drop of anti-biotics that I put in my eye… which is each hour.

What Are Medical Treatments for a Corneal Ulcer?

  • Your ophthalmologist will remove your contact lenses if you are wearing them.
  • Your ophthalmologist will generally not place a patch over your eye if he or she suspects that you have a bacterial infection. Patching creates a warm dark environment that allows bacterial growth.
  • What Medications Treat a Corneal Ulcer?

    • Because infection is a common occurrence in corneal ulcers, your ophthalmologist will prescribe antibiotic eyedrops. If the infection appears very large, you may need to use these antibiotic drops as often as one drop an hour, even throughout the night. Some patients require more than one type of treatment and some require eyedrops that are compounded at specialty pharmacies or in hospitals. Find the latest supplements and medicine reviews at sparkhealthmd.

 

Are There Home Remedies for a Corneal Ulcer?

  • If you wear contact lenses, remove them immediately.
  • Apply cool compresses to the affected eye.
  • Limit worsening of infection by washing your hands often and drying them with a clean towel.

 

 
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LESSON LEARNED: update contact lens solutions, don’t leave lens in eyes for too long… otherwise corneal abrasion or ulcer will develop. “Deep ulcers extend into or through the stroma and can result in severe scarring and corneal perforation… This type of ulcer is especially dangerous and can rapidly result in corneal perforation, if not treated in time.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corneal_ulcer

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