Monthly Archives: December 2010

Christmas @ Historic Kogawa House with poets Joy Kogawa, George McWhirter and Christine Lowther.

Poetry
and Christmas Party at Historic Joy Kogawa House for friends and
family!

Poets George McWhirter, Christine Lowther, Joy Kogawa and
special guests!
 + Christmas accordion by Todd Wong

A few weeks ago, I was introduced to a poet from Tofino through her sister, who I know because we both work at the Vancouver Public Library.  Poet Christine Lowther would be coming to Vancouver, and looking for a place for a book launch for her new book MY NATURE.

Lowther_My_Nature

I conversed with Christine about helping to set up a book launch at Kogawa House, as I knew that her mother Pat Lowther had been friends with Joy Kogawa.  Christine also shared that Joy had written the introduction for her first book of poetry. 

Things quickly fell into place, and after a few suggestions, it was decided to combine a book launch for Christine with a Kogawa House Christmas party.  This way, it could be a reunion of old friends for Christine with Joy.  And I have discovered that with Christine, we both share a joy for Nature, Conservation, Environmental Sustainability and Resistance to Clear Cut Logging.  Naturally,  We also have many environmental activist friends in common.

Another friend of Kogawa House is George McWhirter, who as the inaugural poet laureate of the City of Vancouver, had created VERSE MAP OF VANCOUVER, which included poems by Joy Kogawa and Pat Lowther.  When the book was launched at the Vancouver Public Library Central Branch, the Pat Lowther poem had been read by Pat's daughter Beth.  Hmmm…. I thought…. Wouldn't it be great to have Verse Map of Vancouver read at Kogawa House?  Especially since Joy Kogawa's poem is about Kogawa House!

So on Dec 12th, Sunday at 2:30pm, we will have a very special poetry reading at Historic Joy Kogawa House with friends and family.

Our House is small, intimate and cosy.  RSVP to attend : or gunghaggis (at ) yahoo.ca

Evelyn Lau to recieve the ACWW Community Builder Award at Ricepaper Magazine 15th Anniversary Dinner

Evelyn Lau will receive the ACWW Community Builder Dinner at the 15th Anniversary Ricepaper Magazine Dinner

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Evelyn Lau recently received the City of Vancouver Mayor's Arts Award for Literary Arts.

On Saturday December 11th, Evelyn will receive the ACWW Community Builder Award.  This award was first created for 2002, and awarded to Roy Mah, Wayson Choy and Paul Yee.

Lau is the youngest person to have received the Governor General's Award for poetry.  She has published poetry, short stories and non-fiction.  Her first memoir, Runaway: Diary of a Street Kid, set her on the national and international literary stages.  It was turned into a movie Diary of Evelyn Lau, where her character was played by Sandra Oh, the award winning Korean-Canadian actor who has starred in the movie Sideways and tv series Grey's Anatomy.

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2010_November_Mayors_Arts_Awards 106

Evelyn was congratulated by Todd Wong and Patricia Lim after the awards.  Todd is ACWW vice-president and Patricia is Managing Editor of Ricepaper Magazine.

Ricepaper magazine is celebrating its 15th anniversary at Foo’s Ho Ho Restaurant on Saturday, December 11, 2010

Ricepaper 15th Anniversary Poster

Ricepaper 15th Anniversary Poster

Ricepaper magazine, the Asian Canadian Writers’ Workshop
and Friends of Foo’s Ho Ho cordially invite you to participate in the
celebration of Ricepaper‘s milestone 15th anniversary at Foo’s
Ho Ho Restaurant, the oldest surviving Chinese restaurant in historic
Chinatown, for a taste of pioneer-style Chinese food.

Ricepaper is Canada’s only nationally-distributed literary
magazine devoted to showcasing Asian Canadian artists, writers,
performers and innovators. For 15 years, Ricepaper has
published important work for and about Asian Canadian community
luminaries such as David Suzuki, Fred Wah, Denise Chong, and Evelyn Lau
while also providing opportunities for new and emerging talent to
publish their work.

The evening will be co-hosted by actor Patrick Gallagher (Glee, True Blood)
and actor, radio broadcaster, and comedian Tetsuro Shigematsu and will
include an 8 course meal, special celebrity guests and a raffle draw.

Date: Saturday, December 11, 2010 at 6pm

Place: Foo’s Ho Ho Restaurant, 102 East Pender Street
View Larger Map

Price: $40 donation includes a 1-year subscription to Ricepaper magazine

For reservations and tickets please contact Friends of Foo’s Ho Ho
(Jacqueline):  (604) 395-4274 or Ricepaper office (Patricia):  (604)
872-3464 or reserve your spot online via paypal:

Raffle prizes include:
– A gift certificate from Ganache Patisserie
– Thai-Pantry-in-a-Box (culinary starter kit) from South China Seas Trading Co.
– Two complimentary tickets to Great Expectations – a February 2011 Gateway Theatre production.
– Vanessa Lowe (artwork). See Vanessa’s Eastside Culture Crawl profile here
– A set of books from Nikkei Place
– Two  bottles Australian Yellowtail Cabernet red wine
– Two  bottles Australian Black Swan Cabernet Red wine
– Two  bottles Concannon (USA) Sauvignon White wine

Ricepaper 15th Anniversary celebration ticket

Note: we will be contacting you for address information for the subscription included with this ticket.

$40.00Price:



Toddish McWong and the Macleod tartan – but where can I find a McWong tartan?

Looking for a McWong tartan…
or should I just wear a Macleod tartan?

image
Chinese-Canadian dudes wear kilts!  Here I am at the 2010 BC Highland Games, wearing the Macleod of Lewis tartan, also known as the “Loud Macleod.”  There is is no McWong tartan…. 
“Wong” means “yellow” in the Chinese language. So I found the most yellow kilt I
could find.   I did wear it at
the BC Highland Games this year… much to the delight of the Clan Macleod
Association of Canada, a few tables down from the Clan Gung Haggis Fat Choy
table.

The gentleman on the right is wearing the Chan plaid, that was originally created for Canadian Highland Dance Champion Betty Chan, way back in the 1960's.  In the life-size photo on the left (made for the BC Royal Museum), “I” am wearing the modern Fraser Hunting Tartan.  I love the blues and reds in it.   I have had several kilts and mini-kilts made up for the Gung Haggis dragonboat team, which we wear for paddling in races, or at Kilts Night events.

photo

Here I am with “Betty McChan” on New Year's Day.  She is wearing the Chan plaid that was made into a jacket for her father Ernest Chan.  Betty told me that the colours were chosen to represent specific things, such as red for China, yellow for Saskatchewan, blue for Scotland…   I am wearing the Ancient Fraser Hunting tartan.  It is the first kilt that I ever wore, and I wore it for the Burns ceremony haggis tasting at Simon Fraser University, back in 1993.  It's very Fraser, but not very McWong!

 
image
Todd Wong and Deb Martin – photo courtesy of Ling Chan, Vancouver Opera Social Media

Here I am wearing the Macleod Tartan at the recent Vancouver Opera production of Lucia Di Lammermoor.  This Donizetti opera was set in the lowlands of Scotland, East of Edinburgh.  Disappointedly, I didn't notice anybody else wearing a kilt.  Deb thought it was amusing, attending the opera, and having people point at, and comment about what her date was wearing.

 
The MacLeod Tartan

My friend Ian MacLeod is former president of the MacLeod Association of Canada.  A few years ago, he outlined how I could go about to register a McWong tartan.  He liked the recent pictures of myself in the MacLeod tartan.  Ian writes:

Glad to see you in the MacLeod of Lewis / MacLeod Yellow / Loud MacLeod
(all three names work) tartan.  It does look good on you!  If you wear
too much of that tartan, you can look like a big bumble bee, but setting it off
with black is always a good fashion choice.
 
If you are going to adopt that tartan, there are a few things that you
should know about the MacLeods:
First, you could even join our Society.  The definition of
memberships states:
 

1.1.           
Application for
Membership
: 
A person may apply to the Society for membership if that
person:

            
 (e) is a friend of the Clan MacLeod

Second, a comment on the meaning of the name MacLeod:
 

¨      The surnames
MacLeod, McLeod (and variants) are Anglicisations of the Gaelic patronymic
name Mac Leòid, meaning “son of Leod”. This Gaelic name is a form of the Old
Norse Ljótr which means “ugly” or “ugly wolf”.  So MacLeod means “son of the ugly” or
“son of the ugly wolf” – but that may have been a “fighting name” (like Flying
Tigers or Screaming Eagles), as opposed to a physical
description. 

 

¨      However,
Leod could have been handsome!  I
have a theory, with no historical support (or rebuttal), that Leod was
actually very handsome.  Leod was
born very close in time to the days of Robin Hood.  One of Robin Hood’s “merry men” was
“Little John”, who was actually a large man.  So if a large man would be called
“little”, it stands to reason that a very handsome man could be called “the
ugly”.  This theory works for
me!.

 
Third, a comment on the roots of the MacLeods:
 

¨     In my case, there are Viking roots, as
established to a recent DNA test.  Dr Jim Wilson of Ethno Ancestry and
Edinburgh University said recently “I would say that the original and main
lineage of the McLeods is S68+, so Ljot was a Scandinavian after all.”
 Marker S68 at Ethno Ancestry
is SNP L165 at Family Tree DNA.  At
Family Tree DNA, my son Cameron just 
tested positive for the L165
SNP.  So I have established my ancient Viking
ancestry!

So that is a lot of history and culture that you assume when you don those
colours!
 
I also attach a brochure on the MacLeods, that I wrote a couple of years
ago.
[PDF] Clan MacLeod Brochure – TARTANS CLAN MacLEOD SOCIETIES in CANADA .
Take care (or, as we MacLeods say,  “Hold Fast and Shine
Brightly”)
 
Ian

Clan MacLeod Society of Canada website
http://www.clanmacleod.org/national-society-links/canada.html

Clan MacLeod Society of Canada Facebook group




QI show in UK – cites Gung Haggis Fat Choy dinner in Vancouver

Gung Haggis Fat Choy is QI in the UK

QI (Quite Interesting) is a British comedy panel game television quiz show.  It is hosted by Stephen Fry, and features permanent panellist Alan Davies with many other rotating guest panelists

My library co-worker friend Chris Jang just sent me this link that mentions “Gung Haggis Fat Choy in Vancouver”. 

Not sure, when these episodes were taped.  But this time last year, I was still recovering from my Nov 28-Dec 5 trip to Scotland.   I was there to attend the St. Andrew's Day closing night reception for Scotland Homecoming 2009, held at the Scottish Parliament Building.  A picture of me wearing kilt and Chinese Lion mask was featured for the exhibit “This is Who We Are: Scots in Canada” – organized by my friend Harry McGrath.   That evening I met the First Minister of Scotland, Alex Salmond.  See my article:  Toddish McWong arrives in Scotland for inaugural visit and reception at Scottish Parliament for “This is Who We Are”

I have not yet been interviewed by BBC Radio or television, but I have been a guest on BBC Radio Scotland for different things.  For January 25th Robbie Burns Day 2010, I was woken up by BBC Radio Scotland, as they wanted to know how Robbie Burns Day was celebrated abroad.  My description of Gung Haggis Fat Choy Robbie Burns Chinese New Year Dinner, followed a phone interview from a UK research base in Antarctica.

Anyways…. watch these video clips below, and have a dram of scotch whenever anybody mentions “Gung Haggis Fat Choy” or “Vancouver”…. or if you want to get drunk… “Haggis”

Bel Canto singing of Vancouver Opera's Lucia di Lammermoor is stunning!

Wow!  Classical Italian opera at it's best with bel canto singing, and lavish sets with projections!

Lucia di Lammermoor
Vancouver Opera
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
December 4, 7, 9, 11


Photo credit: Tim Matheson  – courtesy Vancouver Opera

Don't be late to this opera!  With stalls on the Lion's Gate Bridge, traffic re-routed to Ironworkers Memorial Bridge, and traffic on the Georgia Viaduct backed all the way to Main St. – I very nearly missed getting seated.  The set is dark.  The overture begins.  Flashes of lightning(?) illuminate the main characters of this tragic love triangle.  And an electric current runs through the audience.  At that moment, there is no place on earth I would rather be.

A group of guards search for an intruder in a forest.  A young woman named Lucia secretly meets with the hunter.  Meanwhile her brother, the castle lord, wants to marry her off to save the family's failing fortunes.  Lucia and Edgardo declare their love for each other, even though he is the sworn enemy of her brother.

Eglise Gutierrez, the brilliant Cuban-American coloratura soprano, is Lucia to Michael Fabiano'd Edgardo. Her first aria, set in the forest, is a showcase of trills and runs that make the lyrical beauty of bel canto opera so popular.  The opening night crowd gladly gave a lengthy applause to her solo.

The singing of all the leads is very strong,  and reaches a climax in Act II after Lucia is married to the hapless Arturo (Thomas Macleay).   Six singers simultaneously voice their own ideas of the consequences of Lucia's wedding to a man she doesn't want to marry, who is thinks she is wonderful, arranged by her brother, with comments by the priest and her attendant companion, while her objet d'amour interrupts the wedding too late. Wow! Six part harmony!

And the sets are absolutely gorgeous!  The forest scenes are densely layered with projections on the scrim screen.  The castle scenes reveal a background of a vertical view of castle walls and ramparts.

Welcome to the Vancouver Opera's 2010 production of the 1835 Donizetti opera, Lucia di Lammermoor, set in early 18th Century Scotland, on the Scottish Lowland marshes of Ravenswood Castle.  It is one of the most popular operas, making it's 6th appearance as a Vancouver Opera production since 1966.  It could be popular because of Vancouver and BC's deep Scottish roots, but there was not a kilt to be seen on stage, since the setting is in the lowlands of Lammermuir Hills – East of Edinburgh.  Donizetti based his opera on the historical  novel by Sir Walter Scott, The Bride of Lammermoor, which was based on a true story of the Dalrymple Family in 1669, when a groom met a wedding night tragedy, and the bride never recovered from the trauma.  And thus, one of opera's most famous scenes and arias was created. 

There are dozens of youtube videos of “The Mad Scene” for Lucia Di Lammermoor, debating the merits of certain singers.  But on the Queen Elizabeth stage only one mattered.  Gutierrez moved thoughtfully and held the audience's rapt attention.  Standing Ovations for Guiterrez at the end of the evening.

This is supposedly a deep psychological opera, about the misguided family dynamics, and the tragic deaths of three innocents.  But it could also be compared to Romeo and Juliet, because of the feuding families.  A simple boy meets girl, others try to break them up, girl thinks boy betrays her, so she runs the other way, and 1st boy tries to get girl back, but has consequences.  Oops, maybe it it's more complicated than I thought.  But in our sophisticated 21st psychological reasonings, we must remember that Lucia and Edgardo are likely teenagers.  Their infatuations and rash actions could also be likened to a Glee plot on television with terrific singing scenes, but with tragic consequences more akin to the “I know What You Did” horror series.

Vancouver Opera website is very interesting. 

You can find many weblinks to information about Lucia Di Lammoor on the Vancouver opera website.  One of my favorite perusals is the anime cartoons done for many of its operas. 

Check out  anime cartoons for Lucia Di Lammermoor:
http://www.vancouveropera.ca/operalive/read.html

Music Director Jonathan Darlington describes his personal and dark connections to Donizetti.:
http://www.jonathan-darlington.com/2010/12/lucia-di-lammermoor-extreme-emotions-and-exquisit-beauty/#more-1028

There is even a Vancouver Opera youtube channel.  These are videos of the rehearsals and set concepts.  Don't watch them if you want to be surprised.  But do watch them to be better prepared for when you do attend.

http://www.youtube.com/user/vancouveropera


Interesting related tangential trivia with Walter Scott, Robert Burns and Giacommo Rossini:

A teen-aged Walter Scott, met the rising Scottish poet Robert Burns during the winter of 1786–87, at one salon gatherings where Burns would have given a reading about the time his first book Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish dialect was published.

There is a quote wrongly attributed to Burns “Opera is where a guy gets stabbed in the back and instead of dying, he sings.  While this quote very aptly describes the death scenes in Lucia Di Lammermoor, I could find no references of this quote on official Burns websites.  But I did find it referenced to American comedian/actor Ed Gardner, which makes more sense.  Burns usually wrote in the Scottish dialect, where the term “guy” is more usually found as a name “Guy”.

There are 9 operas that are set in Scotland.  The most famous two are Donizetti's Lucia Di Lammermoor, and Verdi's Macbeth.  Rossini's La donna del lago (The Lady of the Lake), which was the first Walter Scott novel to be adapted to opera, has not been performed in Vancouver.  While Vancouver Opera has produce Lucia di Lammermoor 6 times, and Macbeth only once, VO seems to have a love affair with certain operas set in China and Japan, as Turando has been produced 4 times, and Madam Butterfly 9 times.  Count for yourself  on Vancouver Opera's Production History.

Lucia Di Lammermoor – blogger night and kilts @ the opera

Kilts and Bloggers to the opera

Photo by Frances Sprout – check out her blog  http://materfamiliasknits.blogspot.com/

Saturday was the opening night for the bel canto opera Lucia Di Lammermoor.   Written by the Italian Donizetti, it was set in the exotic locale of the lowlands of Scotland amidst feuding clans.

The last time Vancouver Opera performed an opera set in Scotland was Verdi's Macbeth for November 2006.
Here's my review: Vancouver Opera's Macbeth: Italian opera based on an English play about Scottish ambitions


Last time, it was icy and freezing.  I wore my Ancient Fraser Hunting Tartan.  This time I wore my new very yellow Macleod tartan.  I paired it with my black and gold waistcoat and a bright yellow tie.

Lucia di Lammermoor is a wonderful opera experience.  The music is thrilling.  The sets are amazing.  The story is simple… a variation of Romeo and Juliet, set in the Scottish moors, with a little bit of Glee Club mixed in (must remember that back in early 1700's, girls were married off in their teens!).

At intermission, I stopped by the blogger tables and met the bloggers: Stacey Robinsmith, Nik Belonio, Miranda Lievers and Frances Sprout.  I had some great little chats with Miranda and Frances.  Frances loved my outfit and even took a picture of me for her blog!

Opera review coming:

Kilts Night in December

Good Fun at Kilts Night on the First Thursday of December.

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Todd Wong and Jonathan give a toast to friendship with full pints of Guinness – photo – T.Wong

It was a crowd of some regulars and new initiates.

I walked in just as the band started playing, so said my new friend, poet Christine Lowther.  Christine and I had only communicated so far by facebook and telephone, as we have been setting up a poetry reading for her at Historic Joy Kogawa House for Dec. 12th 2pm.  In the next few minutes she was saying, “I've only just met this man, and he's dressing me in a pub!”

Welcome to Kilts Night Christine!  You looked good in the blue Fraser Hunting tartan mini-kilt.

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Angela and Christine, initiated into Kilts Night culture with Toddish McWong – photo T.Wong

Closer to the stage were my friends Bruce Clark with more regulars.  Bruce is also a kilt maker.  He really enjoys Kilts Night at Doolins and is looking forward to the Gung Haggis Fat Choy dinner in January.

2010_December_Kilts 006

Bruce Clark wears his Glengarry hat, and celebrated his recent Birthday. – photo T. Wong
 
Halifax Wharf Rats are are a quartet of Bryan on acoustic guitar and lead vocals, Tim on bass, Rick on drums + Michelle on both flute and keyboards, while sharing lead vocals.  The repertoire includes traditional celtic songs + Canadian Maritime songs + celticized versions of folk/rock classics.  It's always great to hear the mix of Galway Girl, Johnny Cash's Ring of Fire, and Tom Petty's Free Falling.

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Halifax Wharf Rats – fronted by
Michelle on keyboards and Bryan on guitar.  In the background are Rick
on drums and Tim on bass. – photo Todd Wong

Christine had been sitting at a table with some people who had originally met in Montreal at a hostel.  She invited them to try on some of my kilts, and pretty soon we had a Chinese-Canadians from Toronto and Vancouver + two Australian lasses wearing the kilts, and asking for a pint of Guinness. Cat is the Vancouverite who invited her travel companions to Doolin's.  Amazingly, she didn't seem to know much about the 1000 year old history of dragon boats in China or it's 25 year history in Vancouver.  But she said she would like to try dragon boats.  And she also seemed to enjoy the better fitting mini-kilt then the full length men's kilt.

There was a reunion of friends who had attended Shawnigan Lake on Vancouver Island.  So while I was adjusting kilts on Cat, my girlfriend was putting a kilt on Roland – a large cigar smoking man.   Roland loved the kilt, and wanted to buy it then and there and take it home with him.  I called Bruce over, and introduced Roland to the kilt maker.  Bruce and I both convinced Roland that he should have a kilt that was designed to fit him better.  Length and width are always two of the factors that are important for your personal kilt, besides the pattern.

Kilts and Guinness and good music, always help to make new friends.  End of story.

Pictures coming….

review: Red Letters – a new Chinese-Canadian musical

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Red Letters reveal the hidden tragedies of the Chinese Head Tax, while sharing hopes and dreams with soaring melodies

Directed by Andy Maton
Music & Lyrics by Alan Bau
Book by Kathy Leung
Original Book by Alan Bau

  • November 26 – December 4 with
    Preview November 25 (10 Performances), Roundhouse Performance Centre,
    Vancouver
  • December 30 – January 8, 2011
    with Preview December 29 (10 Performances), Gateway Theatre Studio,
    Richmond
  • January 13 – January 16 with
    Preview January 12 (8 Performances), Metro Studio Theatre, Victoria

8pm nightly with select matinee
performances

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Quick! Name a musical that features a Chinese-Canadian
story…

 

Okay… there was the Iron Road opera that performed in
Toronto and was later turned into a CBC-China 2-part drama with an unrealistic
love story.   And there is the
Vancouver Opera Touring Ensemble production of Naomi’s Road, based on Joy
Kogawa’s children’s version of the award winning novel Obasan.

 

Waitaminute… what about that Rogers and Hammerstein musical
set in San Francisco, Flower Drum Song?

Flower Drum Song was produced by VACT last year for 2009.  Originally written as a 1957 book, became a 1958 stage musical and a 1961 movie starring Nancy Kwan. 


RED LETTERS is an ambitious work that marks a first for a Chinese Canadian theatre company.  While there have been theatre pieces such as Simon Johnston's Gold Mountain Guest, there hasn't yet been a musical with the broad story strokes and lyrical musical passages that interweave the heartbreaking trials of racism and isolation caused by the Canadian government's head tax and exclusion act from 1885 to 1947.

The play opens with the apology for the Chinese Head Tax
and Exclusion Act, by Prime Minister Stephen Harper on June 22nd.   An 84 year old gentle man named Ping (Alan Wong) is watching the
apology on television, and ponders what this event means to himself, his
parents and the Chinese-Canadian community.

Song: Ping sings

 

Flashback:  two
Chinese teenagers flirt and wash clothes by the river in China. Shen (Alvin Tran) announces to Mei (Rosie Simon), that he is being sent by his family to go to Gum San (Gold Mountain)/ Canada to make lots of money and help his family. 

Song duet:  Mei and Shen sing about their hopes and dreams

 

Next scene: Shen arrives in Canada, and begins work in a laundry shop in Vancouver Chinatown.

 

Red Letters interweaves a love story with Shen's aspirations to make a living in Canada, and make enough money to bring his new wife Mei to Canada to live with him.  But racism lives in Canada, as work is scarce and the Chinese immigrants are blamed for many things, including taking jobs away from whites.  The $50 head tax that was introduced in 1885, as a deterrent to keep Chinese from coming to Canada was raised to $500 in 1903 – the equivalent of two year's wages of a Chinese labourer or a small house.


Shen saves his money, and works hard at two jobs at the laundry and a sawmill.  His boss is excellently played by Jimmy Yi.   They delightfully break into a song and dance about working hard, keeping their heads down out of trouble, and sticking their noses up at white folks, despite the racism they face.


Like all good musical story arcs there is tragedy and redemption.


Red Letters succeeds because it breaks new ground in theatre.  It tells an important story in an way that is sure to entertain.


At the Tuesday show, I met Chinese community elders that had grown up with my parents.  They were surprised to see a picture of their family's store, used as a backdrop.  They were enthusiastic about the musical, and said they would tell all their family to see Red Letters.


I also chatted with a elderly white male, who also was enthusiastic about the play.  He said he never knew about the head tax, or how it affected the Chinese families facing racism in Canada, and separation from their loved ones still in China.


RED LETTERS will serve as a wonderful entertaining way to inform audiences about an important part of history in Canada.

RED LETTERS touches a very personal part of me, because I also attended the simulcast of the apology in the ballroom of
the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver, and I was also involved with the Head Tax Redress campaign in Vancouver from 2005-2006.

Chinese-Canadian + Scottish-Italian culture this week in Vancouver

Lots of cultural events this week. 
I've seen Red Letters and Jade in the Coal and recommend them for people
to learn about important issues in Chinese Canadian history, in a fun
entertaining way.  Reviews being posted after I get off work today!  Both have lots of music.  Cantonese opera in Jade In the Coal, and Broadway style musical for Red Letters – with soaring lyricism which reminds me of Stephen Sondheim and Andrew Lloyd Webber's Sunset Boulevard, and Brigadoon.

I will be attending the opera Lucia de Lamamoor on Dec 4th opening night, wearing my kilt – which is set on the lowlands of Scotland.   I wore my kilt for Macbeth a few years ago… thank goodness it's not as cold in Vancouver as it is in Scotland right now!

Dec 2 – KILTS
NIGHT
at Doolin's
until Dec 4th – JADE
IN THE COAL
– theatre @ UBC
until Dec 4th – RED
LETTERS
– musical @ Roundhouse
Dec 4, 6. 8, 11 – LUCIA DE LAMAMOOR –  Vancouver Opera

see details below


LAST KILTS NIGHT
of 2010

and
the first Kilts night to follow St. Andrew's Day (Nov 30)
We can
hoist our
Guinness to the patron Saint of Scotland (or not).
Free pint o'
Guinness when you wear your kilt

Free live music with Halifax
Wharf
Rats starting 9pm
I'll be there at 8:30pm
to grab some seats!

Nov 25-Dec 4th
JADE IN THE
COAL  –
new play by Paul Yee
@ UBC Frederic Wood theatre – set in early
1900's during head tax era
http://www.theatre.ubc.ca/jade_in_the_coal/


RED LETTERS
Nov
26-Dec 4th in Vancouver – Roundhouse Community Centre
Dec. 29 – Jan.
8 Richmond – Gateway Theatre
Red Letters – Vancouver Asian Canadian
Theatre's musical about the head tax/ exclusion era.
http://www.vact.ca/



LUCIA DE LAMAMOOR
Vancouver Opera,
Dec
4, 7, 9, 11
Queen Elizabeth
Theatre
– Italian opera by Donizetti – set on Scottish lowland
moors.
Great songs, love, drama deceit, tragedy, clan wars….
http://www.vancouveropera.ca/lucia_di_lammermoor.html

Ricepaper 15th Anniversary Dinner – Dec 11

Ricepaper
magazine is celebrating its 15th anniversary at Foo’s Ho Ho Restaurant
on Saturday, December 11, 2010

Ricepaper 15th Anniversary Poster

Ricepaper 15th Anniversary Poster

Ricepaper
magazine, the Asian Canadian Writers’ Workshop and Friends of Foo’s Ho
Ho cordially invite you to participate in the celebration of Ricepaper‘s
milestone 15th anniversary at Foo’s Ho Ho Restaurant, the oldest
surviving Chinese restaurant in historic Chinatown, for a taste of
pioneer-style Chinese food.

Ricepaper is Canada’s only nationally-distributed literary
magazine devoted to showcasing Asian Canadian artists, writers,
performers and innovators. For 15 years, Ricepaper has
published important work for and about Asian Canadian community
luminaries such as David Suzuki, Fred Wah, Denise Chong, and Evelyn Lau
while also providing opportunities for new and emerging talent to
publish their work.

The evening will be co-hosted by actor Patrick Gallagher (Glee,
True Blood
) and actor, radio broadcaster, and comedian Tetsuro
Shigematsu and will include an 8 course meal, special celebrity guests
and a raffle draw.

Date: Saturday, December 11, 2010 at 6pm

Place: Foo’s Ho Ho Restaurant,
102 East Pender Street

Ricepaper
magazine is celebrating its 15th anniversary at Foo’s Ho Ho Restaurant
on Saturday, December 11, 2010

Ricepaper 15th Anniversary Poster

Ricepaper 15th Anniversary Poster

Ricepaper
magazine, the Asian Canadian Writers’ Workshop and Friends of Foo’s Ho
Ho cordially invite you to participate in the celebration of Ricepaper‘s
milestone 15th anniversary at Foo’s Ho Ho Restaurant, the oldest
surviving Chinese restaurant in historic Chinatown, for a taste of
pioneer-style Chinese food.

Ricepaper is Canada’s only nationally-distributed literary
magazine devoted to showcasing Asian Canadian artists, writers,
performers and innovators. For 15 years, Ricepaper has
published important work for and about Asian Canadian community
luminaries such as David Suzuki, Fred Wah, Denise Chong, and Evelyn Lau
while also providing opportunities for new and emerging talent to
publish their work.

The evening will be co-hosted by actor Patrick Gallagher (Glee,
True Blood
) and actor, radio broadcaster, and comedian Tetsuro
Shigematsu and will include an 8 course meal, special celebrity guests
and a raffle draw.

Date: Saturday, December 11, 2010 at 6pm

Place: Foo’s Ho Ho Restaurant,
102 East Pender Street

Price: $40 donation includes a 1-year subscription to Ricepaper
magazine

For reservation and tickets please contact Friends of Foo’s Ho Ho
(Jacqueline):  (604) 395-4274 or Ricepaper office (Patricia):  (604)
872-3464 or reserve your spot online via paypal:


Ricepaper 15th Anniversary celebration ticket

Note: we will be contacting you
for address information for the subscription included with this ticket.

$40.00Price: